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Spend Wisely after Bankruptcy

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There are many reasons for filing bankruptcy. From sudden medical expenses to layoffs, We already know medical bills are a substantial reason people file and that even smart consumers have faced serious challenges as a result of uncertain mortgages.

Regardless of your reasons, life after bankruptcy offers you the chance to start in a new direction. So here are some important tips to help you become an economically-conscience consumer.

  • Like buying shoes, don't purchase cable channels unless they are on sale or part of a long-term promotion. Remember that cable companies rely on customers forgetting about the incentive's termination to lock you into paying the increased rates. Mark your calendar on the day it ends and cancel. More than likely, they'll continue to offer it to you. Don't forget about the pay-per-view channels, which allow you to buy only one show or movie at a time.
  • Like going to movies? So does most of America, which explains the $100 million opening weekends for just about any half-way decent film. Before even sitting down in your seat, provided a contingent of un-supervised pre-teens haven't "saved" them for the rest of their sordid lot, it's easy to spend $25.00 on the ticket and a trough of popcorn. You can see the same thing everyone else does for $5.50 by going on a weekend afternoon and not buying any of what's lurking behind the counter. Not only will you avoid the calories, matinees are also the best way to avoid the swarms of irksome youth that pay more attention to the next incoming text message than what's happening on the screen.
  • Try to avoid any sort of club that charges a monthly a fee unless you can reasonably justify that your use of its service will cover the fee. Fitness clubs, for example, literally bank on the fact that members will not use the facility. Most gym members cease attendance after six weeks. Instead, check with your employer about wellness discounts or reimbursements, as many companies today offer these incentives to promote employee health (and to avoid paying medical claims). If fitness is important to you, then find a gym that does not require long-term contracts. A good deal of Web sites charge monthly fees as well. Truthfully, there is very little content on the Internet that will not become public in very little time. Premium memberships and site subscriptions are rarely worth it. This goes for magazines, too. Use their respective Web sites for the articles.
  • People find a surprising amount of money to be saved by curbing random food purchases. Snacks while getting gas, vending machine walk-bys and quick pit stops can really add up. Prepackaged food is extremely expensive by volume and rarely healthy. Avoid it whenever possible. Try to remind yourself that you paid for the food that's at home. Just because it's in your kitchen doesn't mean it was free. Don't waste your money or jeopardize your health.

This brief list is only a random selection of ways to save money. Remember though, every little bit helps, especially when you are trying to rebuild your financial wherewithal. There are countless ways to cut back and still live exactly the type of lifestyle that suits you and your family. Give it a shot.

From the Law Offices of John T. Orcutt. Convenient offices in Raleigh, Durham, Fayetteville and Wilson. Call 1-888-234-4181 today to set up your free initial consultation.

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