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A Foreclosure of Feelings: A Depressed Housing Market Takes Its Toll.

In the years since the end of America’s recent Great Recession, there have been plenty of ups and downs in economic forecasts, fiscal prognostications, and financial facts and figures. But as mortgages rates rose forcing many into foreclosure, the personal health of those impacted went on the decline, as the real estate reckoning wrought a wave of depressed homeowners.

Labor Day Travel Plans Labored by Economic Realities

Remember when Labor Day used to mark the last three-day weekend for waning summer fun and frivolity?

Well fast forward to September 2011 when Labor Day weekend arrives on the heels of disheartening fiscal news that the American economy added no jobs during the month of August (you read that correctly: none, zero, zilch), signifying to financial commentators and economic experts alike that the slow and steady economic recovery appears to be furiously losing steam.

The Toughest Challenge for the Unemployed

A fascinating new article from The Associated Press reveals that the one of the toughest challenges facing unemployed Americans isn’t a job market currently stagnated at 9.1 percent unemployment rate, or even that 14 million unemployed are competing with each other in a country that posted no new jobs in August; rather the AP says the most challenging thing the unemployed are currently contending with is the underemployed.

Underemployed workers, 8.8 million other people not counted as unemployed, but rather part-timers who want full-time work, will be first in line for more hours when the consumer spending picks up this holiday season, negating the need for most employers to add jobs—positions that so many jobless Americans are relying on to make it out of their own Great Recession. That means businesses can plan to expand without actually hiring, saving them money and keeping unemployment right where it is: high.

Employers Continue to Discriminate Against Jobless Workers

If you’re unemployed you have a ton to worry about.

Past due bills, mounting debts, going without health insurance, possible repossession of your car or foreclosure of your home, are just some of the not-so-pleasant thoughts plaguing the millions of average Americans facing extended joblessness.

Unfortunately, now there’s one more concern to add to the job market meltdown mix: a new report by the National Employment Law Project has found that employers are continuing to discriminate against unemployed people in their online job ads despite increased scrutiny surrounding the nation’s hiring practices.

North Carolina, One of Ten States With Largest Job Gaps

About a year ago, we reported that North Carolina was at the “top of the heap,” when it came to being home to one of the ten best cities to find jobs. Despite the fact that millions of struggling Americans were still working hard to find employment, economists were heartened about prospects for growth in 2012 as industries increasingly reported better profits and adding new jobs. As a result, back then, cities like Durham, N.C., which had rebounded with more jobs post-recession based on gains in the tech industries, looked like beacons of hope for a new economic recovery.

But now we’re forced to fast-forward to 2011, and Friday’s news that the United States failed to add any jobs in August. And with that news, you’ll find that last year’s optimism has been traded in for this year’s cause for concern, as the American economy, now more than ever, is years away from returning to pre-recessionary employment levels, leaving some states, like North Carolina—a state that seemed to have so much employment potential in 2010—with even farther ago.

Preventative Measures for Your Pre-Bankruptcy Life

When you’re drowning in debt, and dodging your creditors, you may feel stuck—forced to eliminate your financial trappings as soon as possible and by any means necessary. But, in the process of dispensing with debt through the benefits of bankruptcy, it’s vital that you deal with that debt deliberately and follow certain rules pre-filing in order to assure that your financial future is as fruitful as possible.

No, Nothing, Nada: American Adds Zero Jobs in August

As things heat up in the waning days of summer, the job growth cooled down in August, with the U.S. economy picking up [read my lips:] no new jobs in August as the unemployment rate stayed steady at 9.1 percent. These figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Friday now stand as the most clear and present symbol yet of a stalled economic recovery that has the words “double-dip recession” written all over it.

Ten Signs the Double Dip Recession Has Dug In, Part Two.

As we said in Part One of this series, a double-dip refers to a recession, followed by a short-lived recovery, followed by another recession. And there are plenty of signs that this second coming of an economic downturn has officially arrived in America, including the fact that our Gross Domestic Product has only expanded by 1.3%, while consumer spending is up a mere .1% in the second quarter of 2011. Add to that the fact that the national debt, and Congress’s current stalemate to raise it, is only exacerbating the U.S.’s economic problems.

Ten Signs the Double Dip Recession Has Dug In, Part One.

A double-dip recession refers to a recession, followed by a short-lived recovery, followed by another recession. And there are plenty of signs that this second coming of an economic downturn has officially arrived in America, including the fact that our Gross Domestic Product has only expanded by 1.3%, while consumer spending is up a mere .1% in the second quarter of 2011. Add to that the fact that the national debt, and Congress’s current stalemate to raise it, is only exacerbating the U.S.’s economic problems.

American Retirees Disinterested in Low Interest Rates

Historically low interest rates haven’t really reaped the kind of benefits they normally would in a post-recessionary period. In reality, economic growth has stagnated, the real estate market remains in the gutter, and consumer confidence has yet to recover to pre-recessionary levels.

But bargain-basement interest is also having unintended effects, including what the Associated Press called “killing savers”—like retirees and others who depend on interest income. In turn, the Federal Reserve's low-rate policies may actually be hurting the country’s economic prospects, reducing the income of these “savers” by some 27 percent in the last three years, and therefore decreasing the amount they can pump back into U.S. economy.

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